January drinking events calendar

Banger’s New Year’s Day Recovery Brunch, 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 1. Nurse that hangover with mimosas, eggs and a loud brass band that’s sure to keep you awake.

Photo by Ralph Barrera / American-Statesman. Hops & Grain is now opening up their taproom on Sundays, and, on the first Sunday of every month, the brewery will release a special edition beer available only there.
Photo by Ralph Barrera / American-Statesman.
Hops & Grain is now opening up their taproom on Sundays, and, on the first Sunday of every month, the brewery will release a special edition beer available only there.

First Sunday Beer Release at Hops & Grain, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 4. Release of the Pale Mosaic IPA to kick off new First Sunday series, which will release a special edition beer each time, and the start of the brewery opening every Sunday.

Arro’s First Mondays Pairing, 5 p.m. to close Monday, Jan. 5. Wines and regional cuisine from the Rhone Valley. $60; additional $40 with wine pairings. Reservations recommended.

Wine Workshop: 6 Picks Under $10 at Central Market North Lamar, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 5. Vinum Cellars Chenin Blanc, Bosio Casa Red and more make up the list of affordable and flavorful wines. $10.

Casa Brasil and South Austin Brewery’s Up & Down Tour, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 10. The neighboring beverage companies offer a backstage pass into the worlds of craft beer and coffee making. $35.

Beer Brunch with Independence Brewing at Central Market North Lamar, 11 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 11. Learn about the history of the 10-year-old brewery with founders Rob and Amy Cartwright and pair four of their beers with delicious brunch items. $50.

Ranger Creek Dinner at Barley Swine, 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 11. Six-course feast paired with Ranger Creek brews. $100. For reservations, visit the website or email info@barleyswine.com.

Libations 101 Series at School House Pub, 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Jan. 12. A new monthly series with a cocktail-based theme each time. This debut class will teach you how to make four wine-based cocktails. $10.

Lenoir and Jester King Beer Dinner, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 15. A pairing dinner featuring beers such as El Cedro, Colour 5, Detritivore, Figlet and Snorkel. $95.

Jester King and Evil Twin Collaboration Release, 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 16. Evil Twin Brewing’s owner helped to brew the World’s Worst Twin, an oak barrel-fermented farmhouse ale refermented with blueberries, and he’ll be at Jester King on Jan. 17.

Rogness’ Brunch at the Brewery, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18. How about beers for breakfast? Offerings include Yogi, Holiday, Sophina (a pineapple sour ale) and the brand new Iapetus Stout.

Shaving Heads for St. Baldrick’s at Hops & Grain, 12 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18. Event is free if you shave your head; otherwise, it’s $25 and you’ll get a souvenir pint glass and 4 beer tickets. Proceeds go to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation to fund the fight against childhood cancers.

Somms Under Fire, 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18. A wine and food pairing competition that will pit three sommeliers against each other in this event organized by Keeper Collection. $60 general admission, $125 VIP.

3rd Annual Silverback Pub Crawl, 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 24. Trek through Rainey Street (ideally in a gorilla suit) to raise awareness for the Austin Gorilla Run on Jan. 31.

2nd Annual Austin Bacon and Beer Festival, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25. Bacon-centric dishes from 30 notable Central Texas restaurants, including Barley Swine, Searsucker and Salty Sow; and craft beer from 12 breweries, including Independence, Save the World and South Austin.

Pappy Whiskey Flight at Easy Tiger, 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26 and Tuesday, Jan. 27. Just 32 flights of the 10 year, 12 year, 15 year and 20 year Pappy Van Winkle bourbons will be available each day for this very special offering. Plan accordingly. $50.

Firkin Tapping at Banger’s, 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29. This Thursday’s firkin tapping features Prairie Birra flavored with ginger; next Thursday’s will be Jester King Le Petit Prince dry-hopped with Mosaic hops.

Blue Moon’s White IPA Hunt, 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29. The first 20 to arrive at the designated starting location (30.172035, -97.825846) will receive a clue leading them to the second secret location — and a first taste of the new White IPA.

Live at the Deep Eddy Distillery, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 30 and Saturday, Jan. 31. Live music and food trucks are now going to be fixtures at the distillery. This weekend: Whole Foods truck both days, Dawn & Hawkes Friday and Milk Drive Trio Saturday.

Cuvee Coffee Bar introducing crowlers to Austin

Cuvee Coffee Bar is introducing crowlers, an Oskar Blues creation, to Austinites tonight at the release party of Austin Beerworks Sputnik.
Cuvee Coffee Bar is introducing crowlers, an Oskar Blues creation, to Austinites tonight at the release party of Austin Beerworks Sputnik.

The average can of beer holds about 12 oz. of beer. The average growler holds about 64 oz. What happens when you cross the two? A 32 oz. crowler, that’s what.

The super-sized can, which originated with the Oskar Blues Brewery in Colorado, is now making its debut in Austin at Cuvee Coffee Bar, an eastside coffee shop with a sizable array of beer taps. Cuvee founder Mike McKim decided to start using them after he had stumbled upon the crowler concept doing research for Cuvee’s nitro cans of Black & Blue, the coffee shop’s cold brew coffee.

But what’s primarily going in the crowlers tonight at their first foray into Austin isn’t the cold brew. It’s Austin Beerworks Sputnik, a popular wintertime brew that’s launching on tap at Cuvee starting at 6 p.m. You’ll be able to have a pint of the Russian Imperial Coffee Oatmeal Stout there and then, with a crowler, take some to go.

A crowler is a one-use recyclable can that is filled and sealed on location (and watching that process can be fairly interesting; during a trip to Colorado earlier this year, I saw at one of the Oskar Blues locations how they work). Call it the growler’s more recyclable cousin, if you will.

“We’ve been huge fans of the craft beer scene as long as we’ve been roasting coffee, so when I saw the crowlers at (Oskar Blues), it seemed like a perfect fit for our Sputnik release party,” McKim said in a press release. “We love Austin, we love big cans, we love Sputnik. And we love the idea of people enjoying fresh craft beer on the go.”

Cuvee Coffee is located at 2000 East Sixth St. For more information about the crowlers, visit cuveecoffee.com.

Toast the new year with these champagne alternatives

Go big bringing in the new year with this cocktail featuring tequila, mezcal and amontillado sherry.
Go big bringing in the new year with this cocktail featuring tequila, mezcal and amontillado sherry.

It’s tradition. When the clock strikes midnight on Jan. 1, people like to toast with champagne. But what if you’re not a fan of the sparkling wine or you’re just looking to do something a little different? It is a new year, after all. A time to be adventurous.

Try these cocktails (which either feature champagne or another type of wine, sherry) for your New Years Eve celebrations instead. The Berry Royale features Reyka Vodka, made in Iceland’s first vodka distillery, and it’s a light and slightly sweet accompaniment to your toasting, the closest cocktail in this list to champagne for those who don’t want to drift too far from the bubbly.

Clock Strikes Midnight, with two types of tequila, amontillado sherry and mezcal, is far boozier, a smoky, full-bodied cocktail that highlights all the best characteristics of each of the spirits.

The Fizzy Fox is ideal if you’re wanting to toast with a locally made spirit. Crafted by the bartenders at Peche, this disarmingly simple whiskey drink features Swift Single Malt, made at Dripping Springs’ first whiskey distillery. (If you’d rather not make it yourself, the bar is currently serving it by request.)

And Eversong is a gin drink that Austin bartender Mike McMillan, of the east side’s Mettle, created specifically for this festive time of year.

“It’s an ode to the classic Vesper,” he said. “Also known as the Eversong, which is the sixth of the seven canonical hours, this reminded me of the hour before midnight drawing near.”

Berry Royale 
1 oz. Reyka Vodka
1/2 oz. fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz. simple syrup
Top with champagne

Shake together vodka, fresh lemon juice and simple syrup. Pour into a flute glass. Top with champagne and garnish with cranberries.

— Reyka Vodka

Clock Strikes Midnight
3/4 oz. Tequila Don Julio 1942
1/3 oz. Tequila Don Julio Reposado
1/3 oz. Amontillado Sherry
1/5 oz. Mezcal
1/5 oz. Agave Nectar

Combine Tequila Don Julio 1942, Tequila Don Julio Reposado, Amontillado Sherry, Mezcal and agave nectar into a rocks glass. Stir with a bar spoon. Garnish with an orange twist.

— Marshall Altier of Spirit House Consultants

Fizzy Fox

1 1/2 oz. Swift Single Malt
1/2 oz. grapefruit juice
1/2 oz. honey syrup
Top with champagne

Shake all ingredients (except the champagne) together in a cocktail shaker. Strain into a martini glass.

— Peche

The Eversong

1/2 oz. Nolet’s Silver Dry Gin
1/2 oz. Ketel One Vodka
1/4 oz. Kina L’Avion d’Or
Top with Moet Imperial Reserve Cuvee

Shake all ingredients (except the champagne) together in a cocktail shaker. Strain into a martini glass.

Top with Cuvee. Garnish with a lemon twist.

— Mettle’s Mike McMillan

Locally made Bloody Mary mix made from fresh-squeezed Texas tomatoes

When Lauren Kelleher lived in Travis Heights, her neighbors would throw yearly tomato parties to celebrate their recent harvests of the juicy red vegetable. At these parties, they’d make Bloody Mary cocktails (along with BLT sandwiches) that she noticed tasted unlike any other Bloody Mary she’d had before. That got her thinking other people should be able to enjoy such freshly juiced Bloody Marys, too.

A new Bloody Mary mix featuring juiced Texas-grown tomatoes is currently available at local farmers markets. Creator Lauren Kelleher wanted to make a mix that was all-natural and fresh.
A new Bloody Mary mix featuring juiced Texas-grown tomatoes is currently available at local farmers markets. Creator Lauren Kelleher wanted to make a mix that was all-natural and fresh.

“I had never seen fresh-squeezed Bloody Mary mixes on the market before, so I wanted to create that product for people to be able to enjoy at home, much like I had,” she said.

The result of her more-than-a-year-long effort to produce a mix similar to the one her Travis Heights neighbors served is Lauren’s Garden Fresh Squeezed Bloody Mary Mix, made from Texas tomatoes (this time of year, they come from Marfa, but in spring, summer and early fall she’ll source them from Austin farms) and free of gluten, preservatives, MSGs and other additives that she said is present in a lot of other Bloody Mary mixes currently available.

Her mix comes in two varieties, Original and Mild, and both have mostly the same ingredients: tomatoes, lemon juice, spices and sea salt. The Original has “a bit more of a kick” because it’s also got a little Tabasco powder and cracked black pepper — it’s the mix you’ll want to put in your morning Bloody Mary.

“Mild is for people who don’t want the heat but do like the idea of drinking fresh squeezed tomato juice,” Kelleher said, noting that at the local farmer’s markets where she sells the mix, she sometimes offers the mild version to kids.

Because both are all-natural and featuring Texas-grown tomatoes she juices herself (one liter bottle contains about three pounds of the vegetable, she said), they’re appealing to many of the people who taste them. About every other person who tries the mix buys a bottle, she said.

They’re currently sold at the Lone Star Farmers Market in Bee Cave, at the Mueller Farmers Market off Airport Boulevard and the Cedar Park Farmers Market near Lakeline Mall. Wahoo’s Fish Tacos on South Congress Avenue has also started carrying them. And she’s starting to explore getting them into small, independent grocery stores as well.

She used to do the marketing for Dripping Springs Vodka, but that’s not the only reason she thinks the vodka is best with her Original mix. “Dripping Springs Vodka is actually really good with it,” she said. “The vodka has a sweet, round quality to it that goes well with the heat and the lemony nature of my product.”

Classic Garden Mary

1 ½ oz. Dripping Springs Vodka
4 oz. Lauren’s Garden Fresh Bloody Mary Mix

Build over ice and top with your favorite garnishes.

— Lauren’s Garden

For more information or to order the mixes online, visit www.laurensgardenmix.com.

#Austin360Drinks: Holiday cocktails from local bars

Photo by Ricardo Brazziell / American-Statesman. Drink.Well's spiked hot cocoa comes in one of three ways. This one features St. George New Orleans Coffee Liqueur, full of dark roast coffee flavors with hints of hazelnut and chicory.
Photo by Ricardo Brazziell / American-Statesman.
Drink.Well’s spiked hot cocoa comes in one of three ways. This one features St. George New Orleans Coffee Liqueur, full of dark roast coffee flavors with hints of hazelnut and chicory.

In tomorrow’s paper, the Austin360 cover story is all about holiday cocktails from area bars and restaurants. Some are the traditionally sweet favorites of eggnog and hot chocolate; others are the bars’ original creations, albeit with seasonal flavors like cinnamon, chocolate and peppermint.

One that I wasn’t able to fit into the story — but is so worth a mention — is Hopdoddy’s Hot Apple Sidecar, a drink with Grand Marnier Cognac and mulled apple cider and garnished with a cinnamon stick and apple slice. The warm spiced apple drink is available through Dec. 31 for $8 (or $4 for the nonalcoholic version).

But there are countless other holiday cocktails out there, too. That’s where social media comes in. Along with the already thriving #Austin360Eats and #Austin360Cooks that Statesman food writer Addie Broyles started earlier this year, we’re also launching the social project #Austin360Drinks. It’ll work in exactly the same way as the others. Snap photos of all your favorite beverages (they don’t have to be alcoholic; coffee, tea and the like are just as worthy) and tag them on Instagram and Twitter. They’ll get added to this Storify and we’ll also pick a favorite every couple of weeks to be featured online and in print.

So what holiday drinks have you tried at some of your favorite Austin bars this season that I didn’t include? Let me know with the hashtag and use it from now on to catalog what you’re drinking.

Fourth San Antonio Cocktail Conference kicks off in January

The San Antonio Cocktail Conference is running from Jan. 15 to 18 next year. Tickets are available now.
The San Antonio Cocktail Conference is running from Jan. 15 to 18 next year. Tickets are available now. Photo by Emma Janzen / American-Statesman.

We’ve got about one month to go before bartenders, spirits makers and cocktail aficionados flood into San Antonio for the four-day San Antonio Cocktail Conference (SACC), a mix of seminar classes, dinners and big evening events that both brings all of Texas’ craft cocktail scenes into one city and raises money for a variety of nonprofits, including The Children’s Shelter, ChildSafe, HeartGift San Antonio and Transplants for Children.

The conference, going on its fourth year, has thus far donated more than $240,000 to these nonprofits and others through Houston Street Charities, an organization created to oversee the giving side of the SACC.

It’ll run from Jan. 15 through 18 this year in much the same way it has in the past. You’ll buy tickets for all the classes and events you want to attend, rather than for the SACC as a whole, which features far too many drinking opportunities and overlapping events for one person to go to and do. With so much to choose from, that creates the trickiest part of the long weekend: scheduling it. But I’m offering suggestions and tips here based off the SACC’s schedule and my own experience at last year’s.

  • A variety of paired dinners at various San Antonio bars and restaurants take place the week before.
  • If you’re wanting to attend a class (a lot of them are filled with industry-related folks wanting to improve their knowledge of current trends and skills about running a bar or making good cocktails), note that some of them are at the same times throughout Friday and Saturday. I’m relieved that some of the ones I’m interested in, such as Friday’s seminar about terroir and Saturday’s about mezcal, don’t conflict with each other, but there’s definitely the possibility that you might have a tough choice to make.
  • In addition to the classes on Friday and Saturday, there are two big events on each of those nights. The Stroll on Houston Street returns this year, but Waldorf on the Prairie at the St. Anthony Hotel (“a unique blend of old New York Edwardian-era decor and romance and old Texas charm,” according to the SACC website) is new. Other event options throughout the weekend include the Annual SACC Original Cocktail Competition on Sunday afternoon, when bartenders will go head to head with their own recipes.
  • Saturday’s Tasting Room is free with the purchase of any SACC ticket or with a $20 donation to Houston Street Charities at the door. It’s going to have a variety of spirits and cocktails for you to taste, so beware your limits.
  • Beer also makes an appearance. The Friendly Craft Beer Break on Saturday afternoon is, like the tasting room, free with the purchase of any SACC ticket or a donation to the Houston Street Charities.
  • Conference organizers recommend downloading the SACC’s magazine “Cocktail Journals” in advance. The January issue will serve as a guide to the festivities, with maps, interviews, special appearances and more. Get it free from iTunes or the Google Play Store.

Austin-based Z Tequila, Dulce Vida release extra añejo tequilas

Dulce Vida Tequila released an extra añejo tequila to commemorate five years in business. Photo contributed by Randall Metting.
Dulce Vida Tequila released an extra añejo tequila to commemorate five years in business.
Photo contributed by Randall Metting.

Sometimes aging tequila for a few years in an oak barrel doesn’t always produce a spirit that’s worth the time it took to age and the price tag people will pay for it. The matured spirit can take on too much of the qualities of the barrel it’s been aged in, losing some of the agave soul that makes it tequila.

But other times, all that extra aging time results in a complex balance of rich woody tannins and agave sweetness — and that’s what two tequila producers based in Austin, Z Tequila and Dulce Vida Organic Tequila, are betting on with the recent releases of limited edition extra añejo tequila.

Z Tequila has just gotten Zevada Family Gran Reserva, a tequila that’s spent four years in oak barrels, onto store shelves right in time for the holidays. With only 500 cases out there, it won’t be around for long, unlike the Z Tequila Blanco, Reposado and Añejo that have originated from Jalisco, Mexico, and are now sold all over Texas.

The Gran Reserva was created with the help of Z Tequila’s founder, Jose “Pepe” Zevada, who wanted to release a tequila that would round out the brand’s portfolio in a distinctive way. He said you’ll notice a delicate herbal bouquet coming from the Gran Reserva, “with distinctive tasting notes of hazelnut, almonds and roasted nuts.”

“There is a big difference between a nice bottle of tequila and tequila in a nice bottle,” he said in a press release.

Dulce Vida’s Extra Añejo Tequila was released last month to commemorate Dulce Vida’s five years in the marketplace, and it’s already been getting raves from spirit enthusiasts who like that despite aging five years in Napa Valley wine barrels, the tequila isn’t overpowered with wood and vanilla notes. Previously in these barrels were Merlot and Cabernet wines, which helped imbue the extra añejo with a cognac nose, a strong tequila body and a port wine finish.

All of Dulce Vida’s tequila varieties — in addition to a blanco, reposado and añejo, there are also a few special releases, including the añejo aged in Garrison Brother’s Texas Straight Bourbon Whiskey barrels — were made with 100 percent blue agave from the Los Altos Highlands of Jalisco and subsequently distilled and aged in San Ignacio Cerro Gordo, Mexico.

To be labeled as extra añejo, the tequila must have been aged for a minimum of three years in oak barrels, a distinction that was made in 2006.

New Fall Creek Vineyards location opening Tuesday

Photo by Laura Skelding / American-Statesman. Ed and Susan Auler, the owners of Fall Creek Vineyards, are opening a second location of the winery next week.
Photo by Laura Skelding / American-Statesman.
Ed and Susan Auler, the owners of Fall Creek Vineyards, are opening a second location of the winery next week.

(This post is written by Statesman food writer Addie Broyles.)

Fall Creek Vineyards, which will mark 40 years in the Texas wine business next year, is opening its second location in Driftwood on Tuesday.

Susan Auler says that the tasting room, located across FM 1826 from Salt Lick Barbecue, will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week, with food from Austin chef David Garrido on opening day and then regularly on the weekends.

She adds that they are planting seven acres of grapes on the 17-acres site and will have some barrel aging at the Driftwood location.

The winery in Tow will remain open, but this second outpost will allow them to sell their wines, as well as products like the Fall Creek wine jelly and chenin blanc mustard, a little closer to the metro area. You can taste and buy the wines by the glass, bottle or case.

You can read more about the history of Fall Creek and the wines they’ll be releasing at this new facility on this Liquid Austin post by Arianna Auber.

Holiday gift ideas for the beer lover in your life

Getting a Christmas gift for a beer enthusiast seems pretty easy: Just buy them a bottle of their favorite brew and put a bow on it. But in the midst of this veritable craft renaissance with quality beers galore, you might want to branch out a little and find them something truly spectacular that they’ll want to make their new go-to brew. Finding that quality bottle or other beer-related item can be harder to do if you don’t know what to look for. Here’s a gift guide to make the beer lover in your life very merry indeed. (For wine fans, I’ve got this round-up of affordable holiday wines to try.)

Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. 'Tis the season for dark brews, such as Atwater Decadent Dark Chocolate Ale and Prairie Christmas Bomb.
Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman.
‘Tis the season for dark brews, such as Atwater Decadent Dark Chocolate Ale and Prairie Christmas Bomb.

The season of the stout

For holiday white elephant gift exchanges with friends who drink beer, I tend to take a couple of bombers or a six-pack, depending on the price limit, and they’re always pretty popular steals. I even wrote a story last year about some of the beers you could take to one such gift swap (it was my very first column as Liquid Austin writer, actually).

I’m now happy to see most all the recommendations I gave are ones I’d still stand by today, from Rogness Holiday, a spice-filled seasonal ale, to Firestone Walker Wookey Jack, a Black Rye IPA. But I’ve also got a few additional ones that are especially perfect for the fast approaching holidays and all the imbibing opportunities they bring.

  • Upslope Foreign Style Stout: Dark and full-bodied, this beer from Colorado embodies exactly the kind of beer you’d want this time of year, with roasted coffee notes and a lingering finish, but it lacks the high ABV that often accompanies a stout. Upslope’s version clocks in at 6.9 percent, allowing you to have more than one (because yes, indeed, you’ll want to finish the whole six-pack). It’ll hit store shelves in Texas starting Dec. 15.
  • Atwater Brewing Decadent Dark Chocolate Ale: It’s about as rich as the name suggests, with chocolate extract added in from a blend of three different types of chocolate, but it’s not overly sweet — and at 5.5 percent ABV, it’s almost sinfully sessionable. Atwater, from Detroit, Michigan, arrived in Austin earlier this year with plans to open a satellite brewing facility here next year as part of a massive expansion out of its home state. The dark chocolate ale offers an easy-drinking, if filling, taste of what’s to come if Atwater becomes a fixture in town. The beer is a year-round offering from the brewery but especially perfect in these colder months.
  • Prairie Christmas Bomb: Prairie Artisan Ales’ superstar of an imperial stout, the Bomb, is getting the holiday treatment with the addition of cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg in a beer that already explodes with the bold notes of espresso beans, chocolate, vanilla beans and ancho chile peppers. Plus, the label art from this Oklahoma brewery pays clever homage to Macaulay Culkin, he of “Home Alone” fame, so it won’t be hard to get in the Christmas spirit with this brew. But beware the ABV: it’s at 13 percent.
  • Infamous Sweep the Leg Peanut Butter Stout: If you’re wanting to show off a local beer, go with a bomber of Infamous Sweep the Leg, which doesn’t let you down for including peanut butter in the name. You’ll catch prominent notes of the nut (Infamous brewers added peanut butter to the stout during the fermentation process), as well as chocolate, coffee and even some vanilla in the 8 percent ABV brew, and you’ll realize one important fact: Sweep the Leg will make you go nutty for peanut butter beers.

Do-it-yourself brewing

Photo by Rachel Malish. Give the gift of learning how to brew beer with these homebrew kits available at Whole Foods. The downtown location also offers cider kits.
Photo by Rachel Malish.
Give the gift of learning how to brew beer with these homebrew kits available at Whole Foods. The downtown location also offers cider kits.

Or if your beer-loving friend or family member already has a well-stocked cupboard of wintry brews, consider something else beer-related. Whole Foods currently has a variety of Brooklyn Brew Shop beer-making kits, from a Warrior Double IPA to a Chocolate Maple Porter, priced at $40. The grocery store is also selling a trivia board game called Beer Nerds that will test your knowledge of the beverage while you drink it.

Austin Homebrew has holiday homebrew kits as well, including the AHS Christmas Day Black IPA to the AHS Fireside Winter Warmer and more. You can either visit the store on Metric Boulevard or order online at www.austinhomebrew.com.

And if you’ve already got homebrewing supplies, Jester King is bestowing you with a gift: recipes of some of the Hill Country brewery’s most popular beers. Ever wanted to make your own version of Wytchmaker? Go here to learn how.

This post has been corrected to reflect that Infamous Sweep the Leg is 8 percent ABV.

Easy Tiger recipe showcases Dallas-made bourbon

Austin is far from the only Texas city producing top craft spirits. In Dallas, a pair of whiskey aficionados have been making waves with their three types of whiskey.

The Herman Marshall whiskey brand, made by Dallas Distilleries, is named after the founders of the spirit company, Marshall Louis and Herman Beckley, who met at a Starbucks years ago and noticed their hobby of distilling spirits could turn into a business. They decided to specialize in whiskey (they’re the first distillers in Dallas County since Prohibition to produce a bourbon) and now have a rye, a bourbon and a limited-release single malt that’s slowly been added to store shelves in the past month. These are all sold in about 1,600 locations all over Texas.

Herman Marshall Bourbon, the first bourbon to be made in Dallas County since Prohibition, is in Easy Tiger's Gentleman Caller.
Herman Marshall Texas Bourbon, the first bourbon to be made in Dallas County since Prohibition, is in Easy Tiger’s Gentleman Caller.

For this cocktail recipe from Austin bar Easy Tiger, the bourbon’s peppery notes are particularly present to balance out the ginger liqueur and the orange bitters. It’s a bold, boozy drink that showcases the best qualities of the Herman Marshall whiskey, a corn-and-barley distillation aged in new white oak barrels.

Gentleman Caller

1 1/2 oz. Herman Marshall bourbon

1 oz. Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

1 dash orange bitters

Orange peel

Combine ingredients in an ice-filled shaker and stir. Strain into ice-filled Old Fashioned glass. Garnish with an orange peel.

— Easy Tiger