February drinking events calendar

Fall Creek Vineyards in Tow is throwing a Wine and Roses luncheon on Valentine's Day. Photo by Rodolfo Gonzalez / American-Statesman.
Fall Creek Vineyards in Tow is throwing a Wine and Roses luncheon on Valentine’s Day. Photo by Rodolfo Gonzalez / American-Statesman.

Whisler’s Super Bowl Sunday, 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 1. Drink specials of $5 Bloody Marys, Moscow Mules, margaritas and Mexican martinis. $3 Micheladas. And East Side King’s Thai-Kun is cooking up special butterfly chicken wings.

Arro’s First Mondays Pairing, 5 to 10:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 2. An exploration of pinot noir and food pairings to go with it. $60; additional $40 with wine pairings. Reservations recommended.

Vino Vino Wine Dinner, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 4. A four-course meal featuring the wines of Domaine Gayda from Languedoc, France. Call 512-465-9282 to reserve. $75.

Firkin Tapping at Banger’s, 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 5. This week’s firkin is Jester King Le Petit Prince dry-hopped with Mosaic hops.

Up & Down Tour at Casa Brasil and South Austin Brewing, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7. The monthly exploration of coffee and beer.

Wine Workshop: Chocolate and Wine at Central Market North Lamar, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9. Learn how to pair Valentine’s Day essentials. $10.

W Austin’s Craft + Craft Cocktails, 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10. Learn how to etch onto glass and how to make signature cocktails like W Austin’s lead libationist Dustin Courtwright.

Cinebrew at Violet Crown Cinema, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11. “Blue Ruin,” a classic American revenge story, is paired with Hops & Grain’s Greenhouse IPA #13.

Fall Creek’s Wine and Roses luncheon, 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14. The Tow location of the Hill Country winery is throwing a three-course wine-paired lunch for Valentine’s Day. $39.

Valentine’s Party at Oasis, Texas Brewing Co., 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14. Live music (featuring head brewer Spencer Tielkemeier), dinner from Stuffed Cajun Market and special beers including Rainy Day Woman, a stout.

Texas on the Rocks, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14. The first statewide spirits tasting of its kind offering cocktails and spirits from Texas distillers. $90.

Hops & Grain’s Culture of PorterCulture, 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15. A guided tour of Hops & Grain’s latest mainstay, PorterCulture, four different ways. $25.

Glenmorangie Tasting at Opal Divine’s, 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17. Sample the range of Glenmorangie Scotch, plus a rare private edition bottling, Tusail, that is produced with an artisanal English barley.

Cinebrew at Violet Crown Cinema, 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18. Watch the “The Wild and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia” with 8 oz. pours of Founders Brewing’s Backwoods Bastard and Dirty Bastard, which are included in the ticket. $15.

Independence Brewing’s Grand Opening Party, 1 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21. Yes, the brewery’s already been opened for more than 10 years – what’s new is the renovated tasting room with expanded hours, more beers on draft and more places to sit.

Epicerie Cheese and Beer Pairing with Abita Brewing, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22. 5 pairings of Abita beers with cheese, with Epicerie cheesemonger Dan Largess and Abita rep Hunter Roberts on hand to explain each of them. $40.

WhichCraft Style Night Hosted by the ABGB, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24. This debut event will compare the ABGB’s version of a certain beer style with others of the same style – this time, the Russian Imperial Stout. Try ABGB’s Captain Ivan Drago, as well as Community’s Legion, Oskar Blues Ten Fidy and more. $12.

Beer Pairing with Lagunitas Brewing at Central Market North Lamar, 6:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 25. Learn how to pair beer with food with this sampling of Lagunitas brews.

Official Drink of Austin competition, 7 to 10 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26. Six bar teams will compete by mixing up Austin-inspired cocktails – but only one can be the city’s official drink. $55.

Texas by the Book Dinner, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27. Fredericksburg’s Cabernet Grill is hosting a multi-course, wine-paired dinner centered around three books on Hill Country cooking and wines. Call 830-990-5734 to make reservations. $150-$250.

Scotch Education Class, 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28. At Olive & June, discover and taste 16 Scotch samples and learn about the history and evolution of the whisky. $25.

Craft Pride’s 2nd Annual Anniversary Party, 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28. Live music and special tappings to celebrate two years of the Texas-only craft beer bar.

Pedernales Brewing, Robert Earl Keen brew up a pilsner

Photo by Tammy Perez / for American-Statesman. Texas musician Robert Earl Keen collaborated with Fredericksburg brewery Pedernales to create a honey pilsner with his name on it.
Photo by Tammy Perez / for American-Statesman. Texas musician Robert Earl Keen collaborated with Fredericksburg brewery Pedernales to create a honey pilsner with his name on it.

Robert Earl Keen — Texas musician, longtime beer lover… and brewer?

When he goes on tour soon to promote his new bluegrass album, “Happy Prisoner,” he might make mention of the beer he helped to launch last year with Pedernales Brewing in Fredericksburg. And if any of the stops on the tour are within the brewery’s distribution reach, Pedernales’ president Lee Hereford said, Keen’s fans will be able to try the beer while the musician, onstage, makes his live foray into bluegrass.

Keen didn’t do any of the brewing himself that led to Pedernales’ Robert Earl Keen Honey Pils, a sessionable European-style pilsner made with honey from Llano, but he was a big part of the planning process that led to the beer, Hereford said, including the decision to release it in cans.

“Robert’s assistant called and said (Robert) had three things to say,” he said.  “‘First of all, he loves beer. Second of all, he really loves your beer. And the third thing is, he really appreciates the way you give back to the community… So would you guys be interested in doing a beer with him and having his name on it?’ I said, ‘Let me think about that. Uh, yes, we would like that a lot!'”

An initial meeting between Pedernales and Keen at the HEB in Fredericksburg quickly determined that the country music star loves pilsners, a style Pedernales recreates with the year-round session brew Lobo Lito, but Hereford didn’t just want to make any old pilsner.

“We told Robert we could do that, but we wanted to do something a little different because it’s Robert Earl Keen,” he said.

So Fain’s Honey, a longtime beekeeping and honey producing operation in Llano, sells the brewery 25 lb. jugs of honey to go into the beer, which as a result is deeper and richer than most pilsners are, Hereford said.

The 5 percent ABV Robert Earl Keen Honey Pils has become another of Pedernales’ year-round offerings, like Lobo Lito, but it can be tricky to find in stores because it’s constantly being bought up. Hereford said the first batch, released in October last year, was pre-sold “because everyone wants it. The first can they buy because of Robert Earl Keen, but the second, third and fourth we sell because they like it.”

He noted that part of the appeal of the beer is that every element of it comes from Texas. “You’ve got a singer from Kerrville, honey from Llano and a brewery from Fredericksburg,” Hereford said. “That’s irresistible.”

Keen’s bluegrass album drops on Feb. 10. For Central Texans looking for a chance to see him live, a good opportunity is at the Old Settler’s Music Festival in April.

Georgetown museum launching a history-themed happy hour

Among the drinks at the Williamson Museum’s new History Happy Hour is the Chatham Artillery Punch — a worthy (and very potent) beverage for the event, as it comes with quite a long Southern backstory.

The punch, originally concocted by Georgia’s oldest military unit (thus the name), was served at a variety of celebrations in the 19th century, including a presidential visit from James Monroe in 1819. And with a recipe that calls for rum, bourbon or rye, Cognac and champagne, it knocked quite a few of the soldiers who drank it off their feet.

Photo by Ricardo B. Brazziell / American-Statesman. During the Williamson Museum's new History Happy Hour on Friday, you'll have the chance to try a couple of boozy punches from old recipes.
Photo by Ricardo B. Brazziell / American-Statesman.
During the Williamson Museum’s new History Happy Hour on Friday, you’ll have the chance to try a couple of boozy punches from old recipes.

That’s certainly not going to happen at the Williamson Museum’s happy hour. But you will be transported back to that long-ago century at the Friday event. Back to the year 1860, that is, to face a pressing question that all the residents of Williamson County had to grapple with: Should Texas secede from the Union? At the happy hour, you’ll listen to a brief debate in support of and against secession, then vote on what to do — all while enjoying period appetizers and cocktails, including the Chatham Artillery Punch.

Mickie Ross, executive director of the museum, also plans to have beer, whiskey and a blackberry punch at the happy hour, which she hopes to have about four times a year.

If you’re ever hosting a happy hour of your own, this punch will certainly guarantee a good time — just be sure you’ll have enough guests to help you drink it.

Chatham Artillery Punch

8 lemons

1 lb. super fine sugar

750 ml. bottle bourbon or rye

750 ml. bottle Cognac

750 ml. bottle dark Jamaican rum

3 bottles Champagne or other sparkling wine

Nutmeg

Squeeze and strain the lemons to make 16 oz. of juice. Peel the lemons and muddle the peels with the sugar. Let the peels and sugar sit for an hour, then muddle again. Add the lemon juice and stir until sugar has dissolved. Strain out the peels.

Fill a 2 to 4 gallon bucket or bowl with crushed ice or ice cubes. Add the lemon-sugar mixture and the bourbon, Cognac and rum. Stir and add the Champagne. Taste and adjust for sweetness. Grate nutmeg over the top and serve.

— Adapted from David Wondrich

The Williamson Museum’s History Happy Hour. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday. $10 to $15. The Williamson County Courthouse, 716 S. Austin Ave. 512-943-1670, http://www.thewilliamsonmuseum.org.

Ranger Creek, Adelbert’s and Karbach releasing barrel-aged beers

It’s a big week for barrel-aged beers in Austin. Three state breweries are releasing their versions of these beasts in bars and stores around town, and they’re all limited and hard to find and at 10 percent ABV or higher. Happy hunting.

Ranger Creek’s Texas Bourbon Barrel series

As both a brewery and a distillery — the only enterprise of its kind in Texas — Ranger Creek in San Antonio has some pretty special opportunities to combine its two operations: namely, to age its beers in its own whiskey barrels. That’s what the owners have decided to do with the new Texas Bourbon Barrel series, which is debuting the first beer on a very limited run Tuesday (San Antonio’s getting 1,400 bottles, so Austin’s allocation is likely less than that).

Ranger Creek's Imperial Brown Ale, which aged in whiskey barrels, is releasing on Tuesday in very limited numbers.
Ranger Creek’s Imperial Brown Ale, which aged in whiskey barrels, is releasing on Tuesday in very limited numbers.

This first release is a 10 percent ABV Imperial Brown Ale that is helping to achieve Ranger Creek’s desire to “highlight the unique and fascinating relationship between beer and whiskey through interesting products,” according to a blog post from the “brewstillery.”

It’s a “big, sweet ale that boasts loads of caramel and toffee notes balanced with roasted malts and a rich creaminess,” and it will come in 22 oz. bombers, the post said.

Although the ultimate goal is to age the beers in this series entirely in Ranger Creek barrels, the brown ale primarily spent time in Four Roses bourbon barrels, followed by Ranger Creek’s own Rimfire and .44 Rye barrels. Expect the other brews in this series to be different styles and in different packaging.

Adelbert’s Tripel Treat

The second beer in Adelbert’s collaboration series with the local Treaty Oak Distilling Co. is a rum barrel-aged delight — essentially, a bigger, boozier version of the brewery’s Tripel B.

Launching this week, Tripel Treat was aged in Treaty Oak’s Barrel Reserve Rum barrels, and according to a press release, the time in rum barrels gave the 11. 7 percent ABV beer “an exquisite balance of warming rum notes, soft coconut and smooth oak, with a surprisingly fruity nose.”

The first beer in the Treaty Oak barrel series, Contemplating Waterloo, went into gin barrels. Adelbert’s founder Scott Hovey said in the press release that he purposely decided to steer away from bourbon barrel-aging with Treaty Oak “to make new and innovative combinations of barrel aged beers… The rum barrels really made the vanilla notes pop in ways that other barrels don’t. This beer has a complexity you’ll want to explore.”

With only 110 cases of the Tripel Treat available for Austin, Houston, Dallas and San Antonio, the brewery will be posting on social media a list of accounts receiving Tripel Treat as it is delivered to each city.

But if you aren’t able to get your hands on a bottle, don’t worry: Adelbert’s hopes to release future batches of Tripel Treat.

Karbach’s Bourbon Barrel Hellfighter

The Houston brewery’s latest BBH, as it’s commonly called, has already started appearing in local bars this weekend, such as the Brew & Brew and the Flying Saucer, and you’ll want to order some before it’s gone.

Rich and malty, with a bourbon nose and a charred cocoa heart, BBH, an American-style porter, was originally part of Karbach’s F.U.N series, its barrel-aging program, but became a series of its own when brewers decided they wanted to release it several times a year, rather than just once or twice. Each version of the 11 percent ABV beer is aged for a minimum of 5 months in bourbon barrels.

For more information about BBH, visit Karbach’s website.

Untapped Fest coming to Austin on April 18

Photo by Tammy Perez / For American-Statesman. Carson Creek Ranch has played host to some local events such as the Austin Psych Fest, and it'll now be the location of Untapped, coming to Austin for the first time in April.
Photo by Tammy Perez / For American-Statesman. Carson Creek Ranch has played host to some local events such as the Austin Psych Fest, and it’ll now be the location of Untapped, coming to Austin for the first time in April.

Untapped, a beer and music festival that’s previously been held in Houston, Dallas and other Texas locations, is debuting in Austin in April at Carson Creek Ranch, and presale tickets are available now through Feb 2 starting at $25.

The beer list will include more than 200 craft beers from more than 65 breweries, while the live music lineup includes Manchester Orchestra, Phosphorescent, Black Joe Lewis, Jean Grae and more. Look for the full list of participating breweries — and, after that, the list of beers — to be coming soon.

“We have looked to bring Untapped to Austin for several years now, so we are thrilled that the circumstances finally aligned to make this possible,” festival organizer Matthew Harber, of Spune Productions, said in a press release. “We believe Untapped is uniquely tailored to fit the Austin scene in a way that genuinely speaks to both the city’s music and beer culture. We are very, very excited.”

The location of this eighth edition of Untapped, the 20-acre Carson Creek Ranch, is set to have a busy spring, with other events such as the Austin Psych Fest also taking place there.

Tickets are on sale now at the Spune Productions website, where you can purchase them presale for $25 to $60 until next week, when they go up to $32 to $65.

For more information, visit the Untapped Festival website.

Dive into the boozy world of Death & Co. with new cocktail book

No, death is not actually a partner in the boozy business — the lively, innovative group behind New York City bar Death & Co. has, if anything, helped to breathe life into the concept of well-sourced, well-crafted cocktails since opening in 2006.

Photo by William Hereford. New York bar Death & Co. has published a book with myriad cocktail recipes that bar staff has come up with over the years, including Strange Brew, a gin cocktail topped with beer.
Photo by William Hereford. New York bar Death & Co. has published a book with myriad cocktail recipes that bar staff has come up with over the years, including Strange Brew, a gin cocktail topped with beer.

And now the bar’s published a hefty book full of those very cocktails, as well ingredient and bartending guides, anecdotes from behind the bar and stunning photos to boot.

The door-stopper of a tome, “Death & Co.: Modern Classic Cocktails,” is so much more than just a collection of recipes. It’s a veritable ode to the current cocktail renaissance that Death & Co. and other bars have been responsible for creating and nurturing. The perhaps-not-so-secret ingredient behind their success: passion.

“Within the genesis of every new drink lies an important question: are you trying to present a new idea in cocktail form, or are you creating just for the sake of creation?” book authors David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald and Alex Day ask. “If the latter, it’s probably not going to be very good. It will lack the soul that all of the best drinks possess. A successful drink needs a focus, be it an inspiring ingredient, a new flavor combination, or a thematic idea, and sometimes employs a combination of these.”

That’s how the East Village bar has been crucial over the years in introducing people to drinks beyond the appletini.

Drinks such as the Oaxaca Old Fashioned, made with mezcal at a time when the smoky agave spirit was little known. Drinks such as the Conference, a tiki cocktail disguised as an Old Fashioned and featuring two base spirits, rye and bourbon, instead of one.

And drinks such as the Strange Brew, a beer-and-gin elixir that “uses beer like a modifier: to add a spicy, aromatic flavor, enhancing the base spirit rather than overwhelming it.”

The bartender who created it, Thomas Waugh, also did something else ingenious, according to the book. “Cocktails made with pineapple juice are often flabby or overtly tiki-esque, whereas here he uses it as the focus of the drink. The resulting composition surrounds the tropical richness of pineapple with the spice of gin and hoppy IPA.”

Strange Brew

2 oz. Tanqueray No. Ten Gin

3/4 oz. Velvet Falernum

1 oz. pineapple juice

1/2 oz. lemon juice

Green Flash West Coast IPA

1 mint sprig for garnish

Short shake all the ingredients, except the IPA, with three ice cubes, then strain into a pilsner glass filled with crushed ice. Top with IPA. Garnish with the mint and serve with a straw.

— Death & Co.’s Thomas Waugh

Texas Tribune cocktail available at the W through sine die

The Tribune cocktail will come with a special reporter's notebook (while supplies last).
The Tribune cocktail will come with a special reporter’s notebook (while supplies last).

Sometimes during the mad scramble to report on the Texas Legislature’s every move, a journalist just needs a cocktail.

The Texas Tribune has teamed up with the W Austin to produce one in honor of the 84th Texas Legislative Session, debuting today at the downtown hotel and available through sine die — the day, June 1, when lawmakers will adjourn.

The Tribune Cocktail is made with Deep Eddy Lemon Vodka, Ford’s Gin and Cocchi Americano, an Italian aperitif wine. Served at the W’s bar for $12, it’ll go for $6 during Primetime, the W Austin Living Room bar’s daily happy hour from 7 to 10 p.m.

Thirsty Planet now debuting in bottles

Fans of Thirsty Planet's Thirsty Goat amber can get it on draft or in bottles. The six-packs have been appearing in local stores as of late last week. Photo by Emma Janzen / American-Statesman.
Fans of Thirsty Planet’s Thirsty Goat amber can get it on draft or in bottles. The six-packs have been appearing in local stores as of late last week. Photo by Emma Janzen / American-Statesman.

Thirsty Planet fans now have a new way they can drink the brewery’s flagship amber, Thirsty Goat: straight from the bottle.

Last week, Thirsty Planet started rolling out six-packs (with the iconic goat front and center on the packaging) to area stores and bottle shops, including multiple HEB and Whole Foods locations, Spec’s, the Whip In and WhichCraft Beer Store.

It’s been a long time coming for brewery founder Brian Smittle, who said that although Thirsty Goat will be the only Thirsty Planet beer available in bottles for the first few months, the two other mainstays, Yellow Armadillo and Buckethead, will also go into bottles.

“I wish we would have been in bottles sooner, but I’m pleased it’s finally happening,” he said, noting that a bottling line had been one of the first pieces of equipment Thirsty Planet purchased, but it was old “and took more time to rebuild than I anticipated.”

In addition to debuting Thirsty Goat in bottles, the local brewery has also been involved with getting the 5th Annual Austin Gorilla Run underway. Each year leading up to the 5K, Thirsty Planet has released the Silverback Pale Ale and participates in a pub crawl and other events that raise awareness for the run, which benefits the Mountain Gorilla Conservation Fund. The run is on Jan. 31; a week before that, this Saturday, is the 3rd Annual Silverback Pub Crawl. And all the planning that goes into them has been keeping the Thirsty Planet crew busy.

“I feel that we’re almost reopening the brewery with all the things going on,” Smittle said.

For more information about the bottles or the pub crawl and run, visit thirstyplanet.net.

Whole Foods Domain celebrating anniversary with Beer Bash

Whole Foods Domain, which has 41 beer taps at the indoor Draft Shack, is celebrating its one year anniversary with a Beer Bash on Friday.
Photo by Ralph Barrera / American-Statesman. Whole Foods Domain, which has 41 beer taps at the indoor Draft Shack, is celebrating its one year anniversary with a Beer Bash on Friday.

The Whole Foods Domain location opened last January with more than 45 taps at the indoor oyster bar and another seven at the outdoor bratwurst bar — making it the store with quite possibly the largest supply of craft beers on draft of all other Texas Whole Foods — and it’s been keeping shoppers satiated during their trips to the grocery store ever since.

To celebrate, the store is throwing a store-wide anniversary Beer Bash on Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. The festivities will feature beers from 17 breweries, both local and national, and food pairings to go along with them. Plus, growler fills will be $2 off that day. Participating breweries include seven from Texas, such as Uncle Billy’s, Revolver, Circle, Ranger Creek and even the cidery Texas Keeper, and the rest from around the country, such as Odell, Sierra Nevada, Atwater, Firestone Walker and more.

Unrelated to the anniversary celebration — but well worth noting — is the Goose Island tap takeover tonight from 6 to 8 p.m. The indoor bar is tapping some pretty elusive Goose Island beers including Bourbon County Brand Barleywine, Bourbon County Brand Stout, the Muddy, Sofie, Ogden and more. Given that the stout is such a highly rated beer each year it’s released, it’s a tapping you won’t want to miss.

Strange Land Brewery brings Westlake-made beers to Austin market

Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Strange Land Brewery's Entire Porter recreates the sort of dark beers 18h century Londoners would have enjoyed. Strange Land's taproom in West Lake Hills isn't opened just yet, but the beers are on draft at area bars and restaurants.
Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Strange Land Brewery’s Entire Porter recreates the sort of dark beers 18h century Londoners would have enjoyed. Strange Land’s taproom in West Lake Hills isn’t opened just yet, but the beers are on draft at area bars and restaurants.

The eight beers that Strange Land Brewery is starting out with all run a pretty extreme gamut in style and alcoholic content — although you won’t see a hop-heavy IPA in the lineup.

Instead, because founders Adam Blumenshein and Tim Klatt are more interested in contributing lesser-brewed beers to the market, they’re making just about everything else, from an altbier to a barleywine. The smallest beer, at .75 percent ABV, is almost not a beer at all, but rather a sort of sparkling probiotic tonic perfect for mixing into gin and vodka drinks. And the biggest, at 13.5 percent ABV, is a bit of a hybrid between beer and mead: a style, called a Braggot, that hails from as far back as sixth-century Wales.

“With our beer styles, we wanted to take what we thought were representations from each major craft country in beer,” Blumenshein said. “You can’t talk about beer without noting that the Belgians, the Germans, the Brits were so pivotal to the culture. As for America’s influence, we feel like (our bourbon porter) is a re-interpretation of what the Brits would have done if they had bourbon at their disposal.”

He and Klatt have had their vision for the brewery and the beers fleshed out for a few years now, but delays in the permitting process meant they weren’t ready to open in a small building behind West Lake Hills’ Hat Creek Burger Co. until the end of 2014, when they finally started getting kegs of their four mainstays out to bars and restaurants in Austin, Dallas and Houston. (So far, Strange Land beers are draft-only.)

Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman.  The Strange Land taproom will open in early February, located just behind the Hat Creek Burger Co. at Bee Cave Road and 360.
Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman.
The Strange Land taproom will open in early February, located just behind the Hat Creek Burger Co. at Bee Cave Road and 360.

Even with beers finally on the market, Strange Land, the Westlake area’s first brewery, is still a bit of a work-in-progress. The taproom isn’t opened to the public just yet; wait until the weekend of Feb. 6, when you can start visiting at 5 to 10 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays — times when Hat Creek’s parking lot won’t be so crowded.

You’ll want to check out the small space to listen to Blumenshein and Klatt talk about the brews like proud parents. “They’re like extensions of us; they’re like children,” Blumenshein said.

The four Strange Land flagships include the light and crisp Ploughshare Saison, the German-style Alemannia Alt, the robust English-style Entire Porter and the complex and spicy Sanctum Dubbel.

Strange Land also has a trio of small-batch beers: Bishopsgate, a rich, full-bodied barleywine; the Last Gentleman, the porter that’s been aged for 60 days with bourbon-infused oak chips; and the Dewi Sant, the beer-and-mead hybrid named after Wales’ patron saint, St. David, and featuring 1,000 pounds of local honey per batch.

These all feature one of the four house yeast strains Strange Land has (a rarity, as most breweries, Blumenshein said, only carry one or two). They also have all been keg-conditioned, rather than force-carbonated, a more natural process of adding carbonation to the beers that he said has made them not only more flavorful, but more friendly to people with gluten sensitivity, including him.

A beer only available only at the brewery is Tibicos, the. 75 percent ABV probiotic beer that Blumenshein likes to mix with Hendrick’s Gin or Deep Eddy Ruby Red Vodka. “It hydrates you and helps you process all those grains you just drank,” he said. “Tibi could explode or be this tiny little thing we do that’s super fun.”

Whether people begin clamoring for it or not, he and Klatt don’t just have their hands full with seven other beers to regularly produce. They’ve also recently purchased the Texas Sake Company, which was about to go under, and are in the process of revamping it with new sake recipes that Klatt and another employee have been developing. “It’s not that hard to get high-quality rice out of Texas, so we’re looking forward to getting some truly Texas sake to consumers” sometime in February or early March, he said.

As a brewer of both beer and sake, he’s also looking forward to the collaboration opportunities owning both companies will bring. “Sake barrels will be an easy thing to share,” he said.

In the coming months and years as Strange Land grows — the brewery is already on pace to be where the business plan had expected it to be in two years — he and Blumenshein will continue to play around and experiment with their beers. Klatt, for one, is ready to taste a few of the beers once they’ve aged, in particular the Dewi Sant.

“At some point in the near future, I want to dig a hole somewhere, build a cellar and start stockpiling,” he joked. “We’re like the preppers of the beer world.”

“Except we’re not planning for endtimes; we’re planning for celebration,” Blumenshein added.

Look for Strange Land beers on draft at places such as Hopfields, Whole Foods and the Draught House. For more information, visit strangelandbrewery.com.