Texas Saké Co. relaunches Sunday with new saké

Adam Blumenshein and Tim Klatt opened Strange Land Brewery in the Westlake area late last year — and not long after, they quickly started taking on a different sort of brewing.

texas sake co.After purchasing the Texas Saké Company when they realized it was about to go under, they’ve spent the past few months developing a new recipe and producing it on a commercial scale with toji (head brewer) Jeff Bell. The saké, an alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice, is now ready to debut with a big release party on Sunday at the brewery, followed by distribution around Austin at the end of next week.

“The process (for making saké) is a little more nuanced than making beer,” Klatt said. “It takes awhile to brew, and we had to learn all the aspects that go into it, from pressing rice to filtering it and blending it. We’re really pleased with our first few batches.”

On Sunday, you’ll be able to try their two versions of Texas saké, both of which use the same base recipe featuring rice grown right here in the state. One, junmai, is filtered, while the other, junmai nigori, is unfiltered and thus has a cloudiness from the kasu, small bits of rice particles that settle at the bottom. These particles contribute big differences in flavor and mouthfeel, Klatt said.

“Our junmai sake is very crisp and semi-dry with a great bouquet of honeysuckle and lilac and flavors of green apple and pear,” he said. “The nigori has the enhanced mouthfeel (from the kasu), and it’s got more of a flavor of oats, some creaminess and a warm licorice finish.”

These two varieties have already gotten good feedback from people who are lucky enough to be drinking at the Strange Land tasting room when Blumenshein or Klatt decide to open a bottle of saké from the initial batches. It’s these beer lovers, in particular, that Klatt hopes to attract with the revamping of Texas Saké Co.TXSake_Mockups_Nigori_Front

“We’re hoping for some crossover from the craft beer world because we’re bringing some really good craft flavors back into the saké,” he said, comparing the Japanese beverage to craft beer as it was just a few decades ago, when there was just a fledgling following devoted to the range of flavors that few knew beer could have.

“Right now, there’s a lot of industrial, mass-produced, uninteresting sake out there,” Klatt said. “What we’re doing is taking a smaller approach. We’re breaking some rules but still keeping it traditional. That’s what gets me excited.”

In Japan, he said, saké brewers have to follow strict guidelines, such as using particular types of yeasts at certain temperatures. But being in Texas, he and Bell, who joined the company from Austin Homebrew Supply, don’t have the same restrictions. That opens them up to producing fun experimental saké, he said, such as peach saké or even hopped rice beer.

The goal is to brew 10 barrels a month — but that, of course, depends on how sales do, something he can’t anticipate right now. Texas Saké Co. is going to be locally and regionally distributed, he said, and bottles will be available in sushi bars, wine outlets and mom-and-pop stores. Plus, “Saké Sunday” might become a regular event at the brewery.

Saké Sunday at Texas Saké Co. 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday. 5501 N. Lamar Blvd. www.txsake.com.

Texas wines win big at TEXSOM competition

Among the Texas wineries who brought back medals from the TEXSOM competition was Pilot Knob Vineyard and Winery.
Among the Texas wineries who brought back medals from the TEXSOM competition was Pilot Knob Vineyard and Winery.

No doubt about it: Texas wineries are growing gold-medal grapes.

A total of 156 medals (23 of those gold) were given out to state wineries at this year’s TEXSOM International Wine Awards, the results of which were announced earlier this week.

The wine that seemed to dazzle the most at TEXSOM, a Dallas-based wine competition that has evolved in its more than 30-year history to become one of the top wine competitions in the U.S., according to a press release, is tempranillo, a Spanish grape that has thrived in Texas’ warm climate and soil and has helped to establish this region as bona fide wine country.

Six tempranillos from five different wineries struck gold, including Wedding Oak Winery Tempranillo Reserva Texas High Plains 2012, Becker Vineyards Tempranillo Reserve Texas 2013 and Pedernales Cellars 2012 Texas Tempranillo and Tempranillo Reserve.

“It is continued proof that a focus on the right varietals and winemaking practices for our region can produce world class wines made from Texas grapes,” Pedernales Cellars’ David Kuhlken said in the press release.

His winery took home the most gold medals of any other Texas winery, a total of four, with wins additionally for the Hill Country winery’s 2014 Texas Vermentino and 2014 Texas Viognier. Although the Tempranillo Reserve is the only TEXSOM award-winner in current rotation at Pedernales’ tasting room in Stonewall, winery staff plans to add the vermentino later in the year, once it’s officially released this spring.

Pilot Knob Vineyard and Winery, in Bertram, was among the first-timers to the TEXSOM competition. Although its debut at the competition didn’t yield any gold medals, three of Pilot Knob’s flagship wines received silver (the 2014 Viognier) and bronze (2014 PK Cuvee and 2013 Franco Rojo Reserve). These are available for trying at the tasting room.

“We look forward to future TEXSOM competitions and the opportunity to impress the judges with the wines we’re currently readying for release,” Pilot Knob co-owner and winemaker Craig Pinkley said in a press release.

The blind-judging took place last month in Irving, near Dallas, by nearly 70 wine experts from around the U.S. They awarded 1,708 wines, with 227 gold, 629 silver and 852 bronze winners.

Two Pedernales Cellars' tempranillos brought home the gold: Pedernales Cellars Tempranillo Texas 2012 and Pedernales Cellars Tempranillo Reserve Texas 2012.
Photo by Addie Broyles / American-Statesman: Two Pedernales Cellars’ tempranillos brought home the gold: Pedernales Cellars Tempranillo Texas 2012 and Pedernales Cellars Tempranillo Reserve Texas 2012.

Here’s the full list of Texas’ gold medal recipients.

Becker Vineyards Tempranillo Reserve Texas 2013

Bending Branch Winery Tannat 2012

Brennan Vineyards Super Nero 2012

Duchman Family Winery Vermentino 2012

Duchman Family Winery Montepulciano Oswald Vineyard Texas 2012

Haak Vineyards & Winery Thomas Jefferson Series Madeira 2010

Haak Vinyards & Winery Madeira 2012

Lewis Wines Touriga Nacional 2011

Llano Estacado Winery Viviano 2010

McPherson Cellars La Herencia Texas 2013

Messina Hof Cabernet Franc Barrel Reserve Texas 2012

Messina Hof Barrel Cuvee Cabernet Sauvignon Texas 2013

Messina Hof Papa Paulo Port 2010

Pedernales Cellars 2012 Texas Tempranillo

Pedernales Cellars Tempranillo Reserve

Pedernales Cellars 2014 Texas Vermentino

Pedernales Cellars 2014 Texas Viognier

Perissos Vineyards and Winery Aglianico 2013

Perissos Vineyards and Winery Syrah 2013

Perissos Vineyards and Winery Tempranillo 2013

San Martino Winery & Vineyards Sangiovese 2009

Stone House Vineyard Claros 2013

Wedding Oak Winery Tempranillo Reserva 2012

Sullivan’s Steakhouse to serve up “Mad Men”-inspired cocktails during final season

The Don, left, and the Roger and Betty are three cocktails you can make or enjoy at Sullivan's Steakhouse during the final "Mad Men" run starting April 5.
The Don, left, and the Roger and Betty are three martinis you can make or enjoy at Sullivan’s Steakhouse during the final “Mad Men” run starting April 5.

To celebrate the return of the final season of “Mad Men,” which premieres on April 5, Sullivan’s Steakhouse is bringing back the three-martini lunch. So to speak.

Cocktails inspired by the characters Roger Sterling, Don Draper and Betty Francis will be on the menu at the downtown restaurant through May 17, the date of the “Mad Men” finale.

Or, if you’d prefer to mix one up while you’re at home and feverishly watching the final episodes of the 1960s-set drama, here are the recipes for the trio of drinks. Each of them at Sullivan’s, located at 300 Colorado St., are $15.

The Roger

(Classic man’s man with a little dirty side.)

4 oz. Belvedere Vodka
1/2 oz. olive juice
Garnish of blue cheese olives

Combine the vodka and olive juice into a shaker. Shake 10 to 15 times. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with three olives.

The Don

(While still a classic character, Don cuts his own path and does things differently.)

4 oz. Hendrick’s Gin
1/2 oz. vermouth
Garnish of cucumber ribbons

Combine the gin and vermouth into a shaker. Shake 10 to 15 times. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with the cucumber ribbon.

The Betty

(A trendsetter with a wild side)

2.5 oz. Belvedere Vodka
1 oz. Monin violet syrup
2 dashes Fee Brothers Peach Bitters
1/4 oz. Pernod
Garnish of a lemon twist                                    

Combine all ingredients into a shaker. Shake 10 to 15 times. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a sugared rim and the lemon twist.

Demand for Jester King beer causing ‘violators’ at the brewery

Photo by Emma Janzen/ American-Statesman. Jester King beers are a commodity in the beer community, especially for people looking to trade for other top-notch brews.
Photo by Emma Janzen/ American-Statesman. Jester King beers are a commodity in the beer community, especially for people looking to trade for other top-notch brews.

Make limited batches of top-rated beer and you’re going to create high demand — which is the sort of problem no brewery, including Jester King, minds having.

Until people start breaking the rules to get that beer, that is.

Jester King recently published a blog post about last weekend’s release of the Hill Country brewery’s Montmorency vs. Balaton beer, a barrel-aged sour refermented with cherries. Only the second blend of the sour cherry beer, its 500 ml bottles were offered to-go at the Jester King taproom with a pretty standard purchasing limit for such a small batch of beer: one bottle per person per day.

But only 480 bottles out of the original 3,000 remain for this coming weekend, and that’s not because 2,520 people each stood in line to buy Montmorency vs. Balaton. According to the blog post, “Certain individuals managed to go through the line more than once by removing the ink stamp applied to each customer’s hand upon purchasing a bottle and/or by using disguises to fool our staff.”

Getting other people to buy the bottle for you was another problem that Jester King staffers noticed. “Additionally, we will be attempting to stop a rather unfortunate practice where individuals move from table to table in our courtyard, attempting to recruit our guests to act as ‘mules’ for them, in order to secure as many bottles as possible,” the blog post said.

The idea that people wanted extra bottles of the rare release so badly that they actually returned to the line in disguise is almost comical — but also a sad reflection of the current craft beer industry. Hundreds of people flock to Jester King’s picturesque Hill Country taproom each weekend for a taste of the brewery’s signature farmhouse ales because of both these beers, which aren’t easy to find elsewhere, and the gorgeous setting at which to drink them. If you can’t make a regular outing of it (which is becoming increasingly more warranted, since a limited release seems to happen almost every weekend), it makes sense that you’d want to stock up.

But by trying to dupe the brewery staff? By coaxing other visitors at the taproom to use up their stamp for you? That’s uncalled for. It’s a practice that Jester King has struggled with before, and to handle it, the brewery is “staffing an employee whose sole job is to be on the lookout for violators.”

Such a bummer gig, huh?

Obviously just enough people out there think the beers are worth all that deceit. Many of them simply want a bottle for themselves and a bottle (or two) to trade for other good beer, since Jester King’s one of those breweries sought-out around the country.

By trying to cheat their way into extra bottles, however, these folks are revealing their lack of respect for the people who make them or the other fans who love their beer and want a bottle of their own to take home. Bottom line: If the brewers don’t create enough for more than a one-bottle limit, that simply means you’ll have to savor every last drop of your single Montmorency vs. Balaton bottle — or any other Jester King beer that’s released.

Canadian whisky getting creative in hands of master blender with PhD

Canada's relatively relaxed regulations on whisky composition allows Don Livermore the freedom to experiment. He recommends his J.P Wiser's Rye for the 'regular guy trying to get into rye whisky.'
Canada’s relatively relaxed regulations on whisky composition allows Don Livermore the freedom to experiment. He recommends his J.P Wiser’s Rye for the ‘regular guy trying to get into rye whisky.’

Although Crown Royal is the most recognized Canadian whisky in the U.S., our neighbors to the north have a storied whisky distilling history, strikingly tied to U.S. events, that started long before the blended whisky was even introduced to the Canadian market in 1939.

Don Livermore, the master blender behind Pernod Ricard’s Canadian whisky portfolio, thinks Canadian whisky isn’t spotlighted enough for its versatility and the creativity that can go into it. Although other countries impose strict regulations on how whiskey is made within their borders, Canada simply requires that the spirits used in making a Canadian whisky be aged for at least three years in wooden barrels, and that the final product is at least 40 percent ABV.

That provides Livermore (one of two distillers in the world with a PhD in Brewing and Distilling) with a lot of freedom to play around with the whisky he produces, among them J.P Wiser’s Rye and 18 Years, Pike Creek Whisky finished in vintage port barrels, and Lot 40, a rye whisky with a cult-like following. The portfolio masterfully shows off the range that Canadian whisky can have.

The J.P. Wiser’s brand, he said, is the preferred whisky in Canada. The whisky took off during the Civil War, when the southern states cut off the north from its bourbon supply, but it’s been fighting to come back ever since losing the valued U.S. market during Prohibition.

Livermore recommends trying the various whiskies in the portfolio based on what you’re looking for in your whisky.

“Rye is very popular right now with the cocktail culture, and Lot 40, which is very out there, very full of the rye spice, fulfills that need, whereas J.P Wiser’s Rye is more for the regular guy, more for the guy trying to get into rye whisky,” he said.

And sip on J.P. Wiser’s 18 Years if you want to catch the rich caramel notes of the barrel. “This is the taste of age,” he said.

The Maple Up

1 1/2 parts J.P. Wiser’s

1/4 part pineapple juice

1/4 part dry vermouth

1/4 part maple syrup

Dash of orange bitters

Combine ingredients and shake. Serve in a coupe or martini glass.

— J.P. Wiser’s

Close out SXSW with Swig & Swine at Half Step Sunday

Drink.Well's Rain King, with tequila and Ancho Reyes chile liqueur, is among the drinks that will be at the Swig & Swine Sunday.
Drink.Well’s Rain King, with tequila and Ancho Reyes chile liqueur, is among the drinks that will be at the Swig & Swine Sunday.

If you’re still able to get out of bed on Sunday, Rainey Street’s Half Step is throwing one final South by Southwest party featuring the hospitality and design group behind San Francisco’s acclaimed Trick Dog bar (a place that’s high on my list of must-visit spots).

Called Swig & Swine, the charity barbecue is a sister event to the Bon Vivants’ Pig & Punch fundraiser at the Tales of the Cocktail, the largest cocktail festival in the country held every year in New Orleans. Sunday’s event will provide attendees — who need only pay $30 at the door, no SXSW badge or RSVP required — with a very meaty meal and plenty of punch poured straight from large barrels.

Among the all-stars chefs preparing all that pork for your happy consumption is Scott Baird, one of the Bon Vivants, as well as the local line-up of Sway’s Alexis Chong, Salt & Time’s Josh Jones and Dai Due’s Jesse Griffiths.

Three local bars, Half Step, Drink.Well and Weather Up, are helping to provide the punch. These will be $10 or $11.

It’s money for a good cause. All proceeds and additional donations, according to a press release, will be donated to KIPP Austin Public Schools, a charter school network.

Not convinced you’ll want to make it to one more SXSW event on Sunday? Here’s a look at three of the punches that will be provided.

  • Half Step’s Rainey Street Revival: Templeton Rye, Carpano Antica, Fernet, fresh ginger syrup and lime ($11)
  • Weather Up’s Moreno Swizzle: Don Q Anejo, King’s Ginger liqueur, Luxardo Amaretto, pineapple, lime, Bad Dog Fire and Damnation Bitters and Angostura bitters ($10).
  • Drink.Well’s the Rain King: Don Julio Blanco, Ancho Reyes liqueur, pineapple puree, Giffard Ginger liqueur, lime and Bitter End Thai Bitters ($10)

Swig & Swine at South by Southwest

What: A charity barbecue featuring live music and signature punches from local bars

When: 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday

Where: Half Step, 75 1/2 Rainey St.

Cost: $30. No RSVP necessary.

Get a first taste of Big Bend Brewing at SXSW event

Steve Anderson, formerly of Live Oak Brewing, is coming back to Austin Friday to offer a taste of his beer at Big Bend Brewing, which plans to start distributing here this summer.
Steve Anderson, formerly of Live Oak Brewing, is making the long trip back to Austin Friday to offer a taste of his beer at Big Bend Brewing, which plans to start distributing here this summer.

Although the tiny West Texas town of Alpine is a long six-hour drive from Austin, the head brewer of Alpine’s Big Bend Brewing Co. has deep ties to Texas’ capital city — so much so that he’s eager to bring his beer here.

Steve Anderson’s brewery doesn’t have the capacity at the moment to brew enough for Austin’s larger market, but he’s planning to get Big Bend brews into local bars and stores this summer. In the meantime, get a first taste of two of Big Bend’s core beers, the Tejas Lager and La Frontera IPA, at a South by Southwest music showcase that Big Bend is co-sponsoring at Stay Gold on Friday from noon to 7 p.m.

There, you might have a chance to talk with Anderson, a veritable legend of Austin’s brewing scene. He was at the forefront of it since 1993, when Texas law changed to allow for brewpubs largely thanks to the efforts of his friend Billy Forrester, who hired him as brewmaster for Waterloo Brewing, Austin’s very first brewpub.

“We were just a little ahead of our time,” Anderson said, crediting the newness of the concept of locally made craft beer and the inexperience of the people trying to sell it as the reasons why Waterloo closed in 2001, just like all of Austin’s other original brewpubs. (The only local brewpub from the 1990s that’s still open today is North by Northwest, which celebrated 15 years in business last year by opening a second location off Slaughter Lane.)

Once Waterloo closed, Anderson moved over to Live Oak Brewing and stayed there for 11 years — until the call of the country drew him west to Alpine, where he and his wife had been regularly visiting since the late 1990s. That’s where he decided to help open his latest brewing project, Big Bend Brewing, in 2012.

“I like the quiet serenity and the calmness and the really laid-back atmosphere of a small town in the middle of nowhere. It’s really romantic,” Anderson said.

Alpine’s so removed from big cities, in fact, that a New York-based beer publication dubbed Big Bend Brewing the most remote brewery in all of America, including Alaska and Hawaii. It’s a distinction Anderson and the brewing staff aren’t afraid to tout, not least because the brewery’s location certainly doesn’t stop it from attracting a lot of visitors, many stopping in while on a trip to Marfa, which is about 20 minutes away, or to Big Bend National Park.

With no breweries nearby (the nearest one isn’t even in Texas: according to the Brew York blog, the Wellhead Brewpub in New Mexico is 227 miles away), Big Bend Brewing’s goal is to serve a solid range of staple beers, Anderson said.

“What we’re doing is because there’s nothing else out here,” he said. “In a sophisticated market like Austin, you have to do something extreme to stand out. We’re not in that situation, although we’ve been doing some fun experimental things, such as a peppermint porter for Valentine’s Day. But our base beers are generally what people want.”

In addition to the Tejas Lager and La Frontera IPA, the 30-barrel brewhouse at Big Bend Brewing also makes the Big Bend Hefeweizen; 22 Porter, the brewery’s current top-seller; and Terlingua Gold, a golden ale.

The IPA and the porter both come from original Waterloo recipes. The IPA in particular is a blast from the past, Anderson said, because it’s “very hoppy but it has a strong malt backbone. Kind of like what IPAs tasted like 20 years ago before people started going overboard on the hops.”

He’s been wanting to bring Big Bend beers into Austin but has to wait for a slight brewery expansion to up capacity. “We are having the nice problem of not being able to push out enough,” he said.

Big Bend Brewing at South by Southwest

What: A sneak peek (ahem, sneak taste) of Big Bend Brewing’s Tejas Lager and La Frontera IPA.

When: 12 to 7 p.m. Friday

Where: Stay Gold, 1910 E. Cesar Chavez St.

Cost: Free. Plus, no RSVP needed.

This post has been corrected to reflect that Anderson is the head brewer of Big Bend Brewing Co.

Share your love of the koozie at Austin360’s Bar 2211 party

Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. This koozie went with me to the beach and back. What stories could your koozie tell?
Photo by Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. This koozie went with me to the beach and back. What stories could your favorite koozie tell?

Chances are, you have a favorite koozie. A lucky koozie. A battered, well-worn koozie used to hold all the Austin Beerworks Fire Eagles you’ve had to drink while floating down the San Marcos River in the blazing summer heat.

You probably have a whole drawer or cupboard or bin full of all your other koozies, each with their own origin stories. The koozie you borrowed from your cousin at the Fourth of July picnic and never gave back. The koozie that holds bottles, not cans, with a long, slender neck and a zipper up the side. The koozie you bought just because it has the name of your favorite beer emblazoned on it.

I stuck my canned beers all last year in an Oasis, Texas Brewing koozie I’d picked up at the brewery’s opening party. It went with me to the beach, keeping my beer cool and sand-free, and it’s back in my koozie drawer now, waiting for my next sunny sojourn.

Do you have a favorite koozie? Show it off with a picture on Instagram that includes the #Austin360Drinks hashtag. Then, bring it with you to Austin360’s koozie party on March 28 at Bar 2211, an eastside bar that got its start selling only canned beer. We’re going to celebrate one of our favorite beer accessories there — because it’s time the koozie gets the spotlight in all its thermally insulating glory.

State legislators file bills to allow beer to-go from breweries

Photo by Emma Janzen / American-Statesman. At Jester King, a brewpub, people can both sip the beer there and take some to go — an option that production breweries are also hoping for with this legislative session and a newly proposed bill.
Photo by Emma Janzen / American-Statesman. At Jester King, a brewpub, people can both sip the beer there and take some to go — an option that production breweries are also hoping for with this legislative session and a newly proposed bill.

2013 was a landmark year for Texas brewers, finally allowing them to sell their beer onsite (for consumption there) if they owned production breweries and to distribute beer beyond their walls if they owned brewpubs.

But many of them said they didn’t want to stop the progress there — they also hoped to tackle the issue of direct sales at breweries that would allow customers to take beer home straight from the source, something that visitors of state wineries and distilleries are currently able to do. That dream might finally be realized with this legislative session thanks to companion bills introduced last week by state Sen. Kevin Eltife, R-Tyler, and state Rep. Jim Keffer, R-Eastland.

“This legislation is designed to finish what we started last session and bring people from around the country to this state which is rapidly becoming the epicenter of craft brewing quality,” Eltife (one of the legislators in 2013 responsible for the sweeping changes to Texas’ beer laws) said in a statement from the Texas Craft Brewers Guild, a group that looks out for the interests of the state’s growing number of breweries.

Already, Texas’ brewing industry has experience enormous growth in the two years since the original bills set off a collective toast around the state. The guild reports on their website that “Texas craft brewers producing less than 225,000 barrels of beer per year — nearly 100 of them — grew 44%.” (These are the breweries the 2013 laws most had an impact on.)

“Overall, craft beer brewers produced 15.6 million barrels of craft beer, giving Texas producers a 5.34% share of the national craft beer market,” the guild’s report said.

And surely, being able to sell beer to-go from brewery taprooms, in cans, bottles or growlers, will continue to increase breweries’ success — especially when it comes to the out-of-state tourists who have thus far not been able to take beer back with them, the guild’s statement about the just-announced legislation said.

“As beer tourism grows, the ability for brewery visitors to purchase souvenir beers enhances the experience for these customers,” the guild said.

However, as with state distilleries, there’s a limit to the amount of beer that people would be able to take home from a Texas brewery. According to the bill, they would be restricted to purchasing the equivalent of two cases of beer once a month.

That’s actually more than visitors to a Texas distillery can currently buy. They’re limited to two 750-milliliter bottles of liquor per month.

Alcohol delivery app Thirstie launches in Austin during SXSW

Thirstie is the latest alcohol delivery app to launch in Austin with the promise of helping to bring booze straight to your door in under an hour.
Thirstie is the latest alcohol delivery app to launch in Austin with the promise of helping to bring booze straight to your door in under an hour.

In less than a year’s time, Austin has gone from having zero alcohol delivery apps

Thirstie joins BrewDrop, an Austin-based app maker that debuted the concept of an alcohol delivery service to Central Texas last spring, and Drizly, arguably the most well-known of these boozy delivery services in the U.S. that arrived in town last fall.

They all work pretty much the same way, since they have to follow strict state and federal alcohol laws.

And as the three apps guarantee, the delivery will take place within an hour after you place the order.

So far, only one of the apps seems to have partnered up with enough liquor stores to be a citywide service, however. I tested all three of them BrewDrop, Drizly and Thirstie all immediately prompt you for your address or zip code so they’ll know which lists of available beer, wine and spirits selections to pull up and only BrewDrop currently extends into 78750, my West Austin zip code. Alcohol delivery is mainly for Austin’s core, at least for now.

But Thirstie does have something special up its alcohol-soaked sleeve: The app (which unfortunately has a $30 minimum order requirement) also serves up cocktail recipes based on what you are buying, according to a press release.

And throughout this week, if you visit thirstie.com/sxsw, you’ll get “a complete bar experience (on) your smartphone with hyper-local Austin-centric tips for drinks, bars, bartenders  you name it,” according to the press release. “Just take out your smartphone, answer three quick Qs, and the app will determine what flavors and types of drinks you will personally enjoy plus the recipes to create them at home or in your hotel room. With a few more screen taps, sit back and wait for that delivery.”

The site, which features a nice roster of articles about Austin’s drinking scene in addition to the cocktail generator, looks relevant throughout the year and not just during the festival. To download Thirstie, visit your Android or iPhone app store or go to thirstie.com.